London Fashion Week SS14 Recap

To guide you through the highlights of this year’s most anticipated fashion events and shows, we’ve put together our top ten most exciting, and personally favourite, fashion shows from this year’s London Fashion Week. From Tom Ford to Roksanda Ilincic, this is what it’s all about.

Tom Ford

Tom Ford

From structured brown leather, spidery lace, embellished motifs and dishevelled buns, Tom Ford’s S/S ’14 collection was all about the modern, powerful goddess. Keeping to his signature aesthetic, the silhouettes in the collection were just as varied as the materials used- structures shorts, billowing pants, cropped jackets and beautifully embellished dresses floated down the runway. Embracing a theme of the cinematic, Tom Ford’s collection was toxically beautiful.

Burberry Prorsum

Burberry Prorsum

After the show, Christopher Bailey claimed he wanted to celebrate not just a strong woman through his collection, but the woman’s form- in all delicate intricacies. Which he did perfectly through womanly silhouettes such as sexy-librarian chic pencil skirts swathed in pastel lace to voluminous candy-coloured cardigans with wispy bows at the sleeves. Bailey’s own take on the modern English Rose, indeed.

Pringle of Scotland

Pringle of Scotland

While the brand has a new head designer, Massimo Nicosia, the collection followed through diligently with what Pringle of Scotland does best- knitwear. With a theme that embraced sporty chic in a fresh way, stand out pieces include an orange dress crafted from knitted silk with pointelle details and a textured bomber jacket in varying degrees of blue. While the silhouettes were cleanly constructed, the exquisitely crafted fabrics and textures used must be commended.

Paul Smith

Paul Smith

Paul Smith clearly had the casually sexy and easily modern androgynous woman in mind when it came to his collection as slouchy suits with exaggerated lapels, baggy trousers, rolled-up sleeves and multi-colour hand-knits made their way down the runway. From long shirt dresses that exuded a care-free confidence to slightly mannish suits in blues and yellows that had that the attitude of a woman playing dress up in a man’s closet, the collection was novel yet faintly familiar.

Erdem

Erdem

Before the show began, Mr. Moralioglu himself declared, “It’s a departure.” And indeed it was, from Erdem’s usual aesthetic, and in a big way. Perhaps not dramatic, since the collection seemed to revolve around cotton shirtdresses veiled in swaths of tulle, but it was big enough to take notice. Drawing inspiration from the public school, Moralioglu said the collection was about, as he put it, “rebels and jocks and nerds and boys who put their mothers’ couture dresses over their school shirts.” While cross-dressing teens may not be the most fashionably inspiring, Erdem did capture the essence of teenage years in organza shell tops covered with scrawled poems by Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman.

Unique

Unique

The Topshop trendsetter label seemed to give a subtle yet significant nod to the 90s in their S/S ’14 collection. There seemed to be an emphasis on the backless silhouette with varying forms of spaghetti-strap sundresses and colourful blouses that dipped low at the back. From slouchy printed trousers, subtle crop tops in bright hues and delicately embellished shorts, the collection exuded an eclectic yet slightly raw-edged take on classic silhouettes.

Matthew Williamson

Matthew Williamson

After last season’s collection, which indulged in a lot of floaty chiffon, Matthew Williamson certainly changed direction when it came to this season’s collection. There was an added structure and a vibe of maturity that was lacking from his previous aesthetic which led to versatile day looks such as brightly coloured separates and equally dazzling evening wear like the sheer black organza dress with embroidered flower embellishments. Williamson, despite a slight departure from his usual aesthetic, dipped back into his signature style of motifs- using pretty dragonflies and flowers across a range of pieces, adding to the overall work and play vibe of the collection.

Mulberry

Mulberry

It was a particularly special collection for Mulberry as it was Emma Hill’s final collection as the creative director of Mulberry. As a parting gift, Hill adhered to the brand’s signature style of pretty, powerful and distinctly English. Yet, Hill created a sense of volume and buoyancy to the silhouettes this time around by blowing up prints, exaggerating collars and oversizing pant legs. There was a strong sporty chic vibe to many of the separate pieces such as the long printed and striped shorts. To make it slightly more girly, Hill added a layer of subtle sheen by using a silvery gray jacquard, which seemed to feature varyingly across the collection. All in all, it’s a tough act to follow.

Roksanda Illinicic

Roksanda Ilincic

Sharp lines, geometrical shapes, structured silhouettes and bold colours- in a nutshell that was the Roksanda Ilincic S/S ’14 collection. But it goes beyond that, as she elegantly mixed colours, lines and planes, prints and shapes to achieve a vibe that was professionally bold yet smartly sophisticated. Stand out pieces include blouses with prints likened to shards of colourful glass and a knee-length dress with bold vertical stripes that splayed out theatrically at the ends.

Antonio Berardi

Antonio Berardi

A sharp shift from his fitted silhouettes of sensual body-con dresses, Berardi decided to take a slightly ore causal approach when it came to his S/S ’14 collection. Using beautiful couture textiles and fabrics in a more urban way, embellished and oversized sweatshirts, luxe metallic jackets, tailored trousers and sheer skirts made their way down the runway. While the fabrics, colours and subtly beaded embellishments were prettily feminine, the lines and shapes of the clothing lent itself to a more boyish vibe of biker jackets and baggy sweaters.

 

Krutika Pathi

Krutika Pathi is currently pursuing her undergraduate degree in Media and Cultural Studies at Lancaster University and so divides her time between Lancaster and Bangalore, her hometown. Her degree, which focuses on critically considering cultural industries, provides her with an interesting insight on how fashion and consumer culture is a highly varied and subjective field that allows her to contribute a sense of interpretive understanding to her articles. Coming from a family whose business is in creating and exporting pure silks, an appreciation for design and textiles has been a part of her childhood. Further inspired by her mother’s antique gold heritage jewellery and collection of vintage handbags, her sense of style and keen aesthetic for fashion stems from memories of home. Perusing through copies of Vogue since the age of twelve, Krutika enjoys looking at and writing about fashion as a form of art and leisure.

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